• custom | accessible | affordable | relief | enable

    "How might we improve the awareness of the day to day lives of wheelchair bounded users"

  • what we do

    Working with Jason has helped us to realize that each wheelchair user has their own unique needs.

    We aim to improve the well-being of others like him

    Customized

    Personalized to your needs

    We spare no expense to make sure everything fits and works specifically for you.

    Affordable

    $$$

    We believe that low-cost products that function well make it easier for those who are in need.

    Accessible

    As far as possible

    We want anyone who is in need to have easy access to the solutions we have.

    Relief

    Takes your mind off the effort

    We desire to increase the well-being of our users, breaching the obstructions in their daily life.

    Enable

    Empowered and Enabled

    All of our products are intended for the user to be empowered and enabled to do the things they want.

  • our ideas

    current solutions to problems identified

    Chopping Board

    chop chop chop

    Kitchen tools currently available in the market are generally not designed for people who have physical disabilities. However, the popular one-hand chopping board uses sharp prongs and on occasion, has injured Jason's hand.

    Table for Wheelchairs

    adjustable, stable and mobile

    Tables are usually installed by others as fixed add-ons on the wheelchair. It is also difficult for wheelchair users to use regular tables that may or may not correspond to the height of their wheelchair. Jason uses a fixed table that is not adjustable for work and as a general holder.

    Bell

    a loud reminder

    Most wheelchairs do not have an alarm installed on them to alert others. The existing alarms on electric wheelchairs are usually not loud enough. Moreover, Jason has mentioned that he cannot alert others while on the move - he needs to stop moving before he can ring the bell.

    Seatbelt Frame

    safety comes first

    Most seatbelts in the market are designed to be positioned below the waist while harnesses are too restrictive in movement. Jason currently uses a fixed table on his wheelchair to prevent him from falling over while going down steep slopes. This, however, is not an appropriate safety device.

  • user

    case study of

    Jason Chee

    Jason Chee is a Singaporean Navy serviceman and national medal-winning para-table tennis player. Met with a naval ship accident in 2012, Jason lost both legs, his left arm and three fingers on his right hand. He was later diagnosed with eye cancer and eventually had his right eye surgically removed.

     

    Aside from table tennis, Jason is also fond of gaming and cooking.

    We have been working with Jason for about a year with other projects and are currently working to improve his well-being in other aspects.

  • timeline

    2018 onwards

    1

    August

    1st iteration and conduct trials of chopping board and table designs

    2

    October

    1st iteration and conduct trials of seatbelt frame and bell

    3

    December

    Finalize designs for chopping board and table

    4

    February

    Finalize designs for seatbelt frame and table

    5

    March

    Expand and complete general user research

    6

    May

    Modify prototypes based on results of trials with contacts

    7

    May

    Link polytechnics and contacts together to create personalized solutions

  • team

    we are a small team dedicated to the well-being of physical needs

    Chang Hsi

    CEO

    changhsi_mong@mymail.sutd.edu.sg

    Caleb Foo

    CTO

    caleb_foo@mymail.sutd.edu.sg

    Jamie Tan

    CDO

    jamie_tan@mymail.sutd.edu.sg

    Le Xuan

    CFO

    lexuan_soong@mymail.sutd.edu.sg

    Alvina Chik

    CMO

    alvina_chik@mymail.sutd.edu.sg

  • contact us

    Launching soon. Let us know if you are interested in knowing more

    Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), Singapore 487372